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Open Access Books at JSTOR

Open Access Books at JSTOR

JSTOR, one of the loves of our collective lives here at the library, is once again doing something neat.

From their announcement:

“We are pleased to announce a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial set of titles is available from four outstanding publishers: University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, UCL Press, and Cornell University Press. We expect to add several hundred more Open Access titles over the next year […]

The ebooks, which reflect JSTOR’s high standards for quality content, are freely available for anyone in the world to use. Each ebook carries one of six Creative Commons licenses determined by the publisher. The titles are easy to use, with no DRM restrictions and no limits on chapter PDF downloads or printing. Users will not need to register or log in to JSTOR.”

The first set of books includes some amazing titles like:

“Bread and Circuses: Theories of Mass Culture as Social Decay”

“Dreams for Dead Bodies: Blackness, Labor, and the Corpus of American Detective Fiction”

“Imperfect Creatures: Vermin, Literature, and the Sciences of Life, 1600-1740”

“The Resonance of Unseen Things: Poetics, Power, Captivity, and UFOs in the American Uncanny”

and so many more. Check them out here!

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Don’t forget! The library has an Instagram!

Don’t forget! The library has an Instagram!

At the beginning of the year, we sent out a survey to the Upper School asking about what social media you all would like to see us on. A whopping 54% of respondents said they’d follow us on Instagram and you’re in luck, because the library already has one!

So if you’d like to see the brand new books, picture opportunities like our Miss Peregrine’s photos, or general library shenanigans, follow us @castilibrary!

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New in the Library: The Believer!

New in the Library: The Believer!

Last year your librarians spent some time choosing new magazines and periodicals for your perusal. We’ve got some excellent ones now, like Lapham’s Quarterly and Creative Nonfiction, and another one I enjoy is The Believer. How can you not enjoy a magazine that explains its contents as “journalism and essays that are frequently very long, book reviews that are not necessarily timely, and interviews that are intimate, frank, and also very long”?

The Believer 201508features regular columns by Nick Hornby, and Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket), articles on subjects such as post-Mao fashion in China, HIV prevention in Tijuana, and having afternoon tea with the high priest of the Church of Satan. Among my favorite regular features is the column A Series of Essential Advice, which most recently featured “How to Field Dress a Deer” and “How to Send Things to Germany.”201511

So if you are in the mood for some fascinating in-depth interviews or book reviews, or simply have a package that needs to go to Germany, come check out The Believer!

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American History with the U.S. Census

American History with the U.S. Census

History lovers ahoy! Back in 2014 the U.S. Census website started doing something awesome. Each month on their homepage they take a significant event or person and do a fascinating write-up about it using Census data.

Topics they’ve covered include:

Barnum and Bailey Circus poster from the Library of Congress

Gone with the Wind and the early American film industry

The Galveston Hurricane, still the deadliest natural disaster to strike the United States

P.T. Barnum and the Barnum & Bailey Circus

For September, they have a write up on President McKinley, who is often overshadowed by his successor Theodore Roosevelt. The article featured on the home page changes every month though, so be sure to check back in October and see what’s new!

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Summertime, and e-reading is easy!

Summertime, and e-reading is easy!

Worried that you’ll miss the Casti Library this summer? You don’t need to be! Our collection of more than 1700 ebooks is open 24/7. You can log in whenever you like. Click here to visit our digital library!

Ebooks are readable on many different devices and apps. Learn more on our FAQ or stop by the library to talk to one of your librarians before you head out on summer vacation. We can also show you how to download audiobooks from your public library.

So what’s in the digital library? Something for everyone, we hope! From childhood classics to YA to adult; from science fiction to historical fantasy to contemporary realism; from popular bestsellers to spectacular under-the-radar releases; the collection has a lot to choose from. If you need a book recommendation, click on the purple square to your right and look at our recommended reading booklet, Pinterest account, NoveList Plus, and recommended other sources for finding great books. Happy reading!

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Looking for reading recommendations? Try our Pinterest page!

Looking for reading recommendations? Try our Pinterest page!

We know that you’re going to want to stock up on books before winter break, but if you’re looking for some recommendations, the Castilleja Pinterest page is waiting for you!Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 12.53.06 PM

Our Pinterest has over a thousand books pinned from our collection, each with a short description of the plot, and divided onto boards by genre.

Can’t get enough graphic novels? There’s a whole Pinterest board for them! Love dystopian thrillers? We’ve got a board for those too! Interested in trying something a little bit steampunk? We just launched our steampunk collection last month! From historical fiction to humor to poetry, we are positive you can find something that will appeal to you. So next time you’re in a reading slump, check out our Pinterest page here!

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